n'mythos jewelry set egyptian style handmade polymer clay

Unique handmade jewelry by N’Mythos

n'mythos logoI have created new unique jewelry from polymer clay. All jewelry pieces have their own history based on ancient mythology. Please, take a look at them, appreciate it and if you’ll see something you like, you can buy each on eBay.

Egyptian style jewelry


In 1799, during Napoleon Bonaparte’s Egyptian campaign, a French soldier discovers a black basalt slab inscribed with ancient writing near the town of Rosetta, about 35 miles north of Alexandria. The irregularly shaped stone contained fragments of passages written in three different scripts: Greek, Egyptian hieroglyphics and Egyptian demotic. The ancient Greek on the Rosetta Stone told archaeologists that it was inscribed by priests honoring the king of Egypt, Ptolemy V, in the second century B.C. More startlingly, the Greek passage announced that the three scripts were all of the identical meaning. The artifact thus held the key to solving the riddle of hieroglyphics, a written language that had been “dead” for nearly 2,000 years.
This bracelet is dedicated to such important discovery.

Rosetta’s relicts:

Set‘s Sahara (bracelet):
Set was one of the most ancient of the Egyptian gods. He was thought to have white skin and red hair, and people with red hair were thought to be his followers. He was associated with the desert (which takes its name from the Egyptian word “dshrt” – the red place).

Greek style jewelry

Syringa‘s bracelet:
The story of lilac, according to Greek mythology, begins with a beautiful nymph named Syringa (Syringa Vulgaris is the botanical name of lilac‘s). Captivated by her beauty, Pan, the god of the forests and fields, chased Syringa through the forest. Frightened by Pan’s affections, Syringa escaped him by turning herself into an aromatic bush – the flower we now refer to as lilac.
Needs to be mentioned, that nowadays the lilac is the official flower of a couple’s 8th wedding anniversary.

Tartarus bracelet:
TARTAROS (Tartarus) was the great pit beneath the earth in the oldest of the Greek cosmogonies. The universe was envisaged as the great sphere–or egg-shaped ovoid–with the solid dome of the sky forming the upper half and the inverse dome of the pit of Tartaros the lower. The flat, horizontal disc of the earth divided the interior of the cosmic sphere into two halves–the homes of men and gods above, and the gloomy, storm-wracked prison of the Titans below. Tartaros was secured with a surrounding wall of bronze set with a pair of gates guarded by the hundred-handed Hekatonkheires…

Nyx’s necklace:
Nyx was the goddess of the night, one of the primordial gods (protogenoi) who emerged as the dawn of creation. She was a child of Khaos (Chaos, Air), and coupling with Erebos (Darkness) she produced Aither (Aether, Light) and Hemera (Day). Alone she spawned a brood of dark spirits including the three Fates, Sleep, Death, Strife, and Pain. Nyx was an ancient deity usually envisaged as the very substance of the night – a veil of dark mists drawn across the sky to obscure the light of Aither, the shining blue of the heavens.
In ancient art, Nyx was depicted as either a winged goddess or charioteer, sometimes crowned with an aureole of dark mists.

Mayan style jewelry

Ix-Chel’s bracelet:
As an ancient fertility goddess, Ix-Chel was responsible for sending rain to nourish the crops. When fulfilling that function she was called “Lady Rainbow”.  She helped ensure fertility by overturning her sacred womb jar so that the waters would flow.
Unfortunately Ix-Chel’s love affair with the Sun God drew the ire of her disapproving grandfather. In his anger he struck Ix-Chel with lightning, killing her. For the next 183 days she lay lifeless as hundreds of dragonflies surrounded her body and sang to her. Waking suddenly, she returned to the palace of the Sun God.

If you’re interested in my handmade jewelry and would like to buy some of them, you can contact me here N’Mythos.

So for now…
Be good and good luck!

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